Poems

Hidden Ships

Hidden Ships

Hidden Ships

Hidden ships sail stormy seas,
Sway to the swell of the ocean breeze.
A rustling tide that ebbs & flows,
Where rustic music roars and blows.

Heads aloft in sacred trance,
Arms held high in spirit dance,
A comradeship of drunken song,
Ancestral crowds, where all belong.

Anchored boats resist the hell,
The turbulent wrath of the Lutine Bell,
For nothing sinks and nothing’s lost,
Though fragile wrecks are flung and tossed.

No pirates plunder this mighty crew,
But crows nests hail the listing view,
They look down from the lofty skies,
Cackling at their rookie disguise.

15th May 2019

On my daily walks, I pass the crossroads, known locally as, “Four Ashes.” As the name suggests, there’s an Ash Tree on every corner. Currently, there’s a beautiful show of different long grasses adorning the area under each tree. On windy days, I’ve been fascinated by the movement of these grasses, bending & swaying together, as the air tries to force itself through the gaps between the stems..like they’re having their own spiritual dance! On other days they resemble the swell of waves of the sea, as they then crash down onto the beach. Either way, they’re quite hypnotic to watch! There are also plenty of noisy crows & rooks flying in & around the village at the moment, raising their young..maybe they know where there is buried treasure? Oooh Arrrr!!!

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15 thoughts on “Hidden Ships”

  1. Peter's pondering says:

    Did you do a long exposure on that picture? It’s very effective!

    1. Debbie Jones says:

      Thank you, Peter. It’s a long exposure of a live phone photo, but it worked quite well, especially to demonstrate the look of waves, so I liked it too. Some don’t retain so much of the structure, but that one did, possibly because the wind was a bit lighter. Most of the photos on my blog are taken with my iPhone. I do love using my camera, but it’s so convenient to carry my phone in my pocket when I’m walking..and probably because I’m lazy haha! 😄

  2. Sue W says:

    I love the way you likened the grass blowing in the breeze to the waves in the sea.

    Like you I love the convenience of my iPhone and use it far more than any other camera. I am a little slow to edit and delete, I probably have as many poor shots as I have good ones!

    1. Debbie Jones says:

      Thank you very much, Sue..the different grasses reminded me of different things, but the very long, types or those with lots of seed heads were just like the waves of the sea.

      Oh Sue, I’m exactly the same with my iPhone camera roll! I’ll have to delete a load of sub-standard/ near duplicate shots soon, or I’ll be out of memory! My phone is useful for macro shots too, with my clip on lens. I haven’t bought any macro lenses for my camera, they’re a bit pricey, but I do like close up shots of flowers/bugs/lichen/ etc.

      1. Sue W says:

        I bought a clip on lens for my iPhone but never got to use it. When my 16 year old grandson was recovering from surgery and was bored I gave him the lens set for something to do, he loved it and was so enthusiastic in showing me his photos I told him to keep it. Maybe I’ll look into buying another.

        1. Debbie Jones says:

          Ahh yes, Sue..I think I mentioned my clip on lens to you before. It’s great that your Grandson’s interest was captured by your gift, you never know where it may lead. I know the youngsters use their phones a lot, but something a bit different can take them in another direction & ultimately, could fuel an interest in photography.

          1. Sue W says:

            Three of the older grandsons have already taken an interest in photography and films. One has received an unconditional offer for the university of his choice for the Autumn. I’d like to think that having taught them all the basics I have been an influence but that’s probably wishful thinking!

          2. Debbie Jones says:

            How wonderful, Sue, you must be very proud of them all! I’m sure your influence will have rubbed off, & your initial enthusiasm sparked that interest to make them curious enough to want to know more from you, & ultimately take it further. I’m sure they’ll know who to thank ☺️

          3. Sue W says:

            Thank you, Debbie, that is very kind of you to say. 🙂

  3. ... says:

    I love your poem and the place that inspired it. I haven’t been to Wales but have been to London.

    1. Debbie Jones says:

      Thank you very much for kind comments Roger. I’m very lucky to live in a beautiful rural village now, after living most of my life in a big city. It inspires me every day, I must admit. Wales is fairly rural, & has many beautiful places, under 5% of the population of the UK live here. Although, London is very inspiring too, it’s nice to be a tourist in your own country sometimes, I know I’m guilty of not exploring more of it enough!

      1. ... says:

        I would love to live in a rural village but I am fortinate to have seen nearly all of New Zealand over the years.

        1. Debbie Jones says:

          How wonderful, then you must’ve seen much beauty! 🙂

  4. ... says:

    Yes, I am very fortunate. The picture at the top of my website is one I took from a lookout about 2km from my house.

  5. zumpoems says:

    Excellent, special blog! The comments are closed for “The Sobbing Skies” post, but wanted to say, that main photo resonates so strongly with me. I was fortunate to spend some time in Wales in the late 1980’s, and it one of the best places I have visited. Also praise for your poetry. You should consider being a lyricist.

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